Monaco’s Spanish midfielder Cesc Fabregas takes part in a training session on January 14, 2018 in La Turbie, near Monaco. (Photo by VALERY HACHE - AFP)
Agence France-Presse

Cesc Fabregas has been banned from driving after he was caught hitting 68mph in a 40mph zone in London.

The former Arsenal and Chelsea midfielder, who was disqualified for six months, told police “I wasn’t going that fast,” a court heard.

The 32-year-old, who now plays for Monaco, did not attend a short sentencing hearing at Wimbledon Magistrates’ Court in London on Thursday, which proceeded in his absence.

The Spaniard, whose address was listed by the court as Belgravia, central London, pleaded guilty to a charge of speeding on July 11.

Prosecutor Luke Bowyer told the court that on December 4 last year police spotted the World Cup winner travelling in a grey Land Rover on a section of the A3 at the Tibbet’s slip road near Wandsworth in south-west London.

Fabregas was clocked with a ProLaser 4 speed detection device which registered him travelling at 68mph in the 40mph limit area, the court was told.

Bowyer said that when the footballer was stopped by police he told them: “I wasn’t going that fast.”

He said Fabregas already had six points on his licence before the incident.

Representing Fabregas, Natalie Bird said the midfielder was unable to attend court because of “work commitments in Monaco”.

Fabregas joined the Ligue 1 club from Premier League side Chelsea in January this year.

Bird said Fabregas “would like to offer his sincere apology and remorse” for the offence, which was the result of a “momentary lapse of concentration”.

Sentencing, district judge Andrew Sweet said he took into account Fabregas’ guilty plea.

He told the court he was “familiar” with the stretch of the A3 in question, saying it could get “extremely busy”.

Fabregas’ offence added a further six points to his licence, leading the judge to disqualify him from driving for a period of six months as a “totter”.

He also ordered Fabregas to pay a £750 fine, £135 in costs and a £75 victim surcharge.

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