Hong Kong's government has suspended a proposed law that would allow people to be extradited to mainland China for trial after mass protests.

Hong Kong’s Government on Monday warned foreign governments not to interfere in the city’s “internal affairs,” following weekend protests that called for U.S. support in the three-month-old crisis.

In a statement, the government also condemned “the illegal behaviour of the radical protesters’’ after violent clashes overnight between some protesters and police.

The continued protests in the Asian financial hub came despite the city’s leader, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, last week formally withdrawing the controversial extradition bill that had triggered the crisis.

The bill would have allowed the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China.

Since protests began on June 9, they have escalated into mass anti-government demonstrations with demands including calls for electoral reform.

Protesters have said they will continue to demonstrate until their demands are met.

On Sunday, tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents marched to the U.S. consulate to deliver a petition asking the U.S. Congress to sign a bill containing punitive measures for officials found to have suppressed “basic freedoms”.

Later in the day, police fired tear gas and non-lethal bullets at anti-government protesters as demonstrations escalated across the city.

Get more stories like this on Twitter

AD: To get thousands of free final year project topics and other project materials sorted by subject to help with your research [click here]


More Stories